Alpine Goat Colors

PJ Jonas
Alpine Goat Colors

Alpine goats come in many different color patterns with fancy French names (since the original Alpines are French Alpines). The color pattern is based on what the goat looks like when they are shaved because as their hair grows out, some of the black can fade to brown and some of the white can darken.  

Cou Blanc (coo blanc)

Literally translated “white neck”, these goats have white front ends and black hindquarters. They have gray or black markings on their heads.

goats

Cou Clair (coo clair)

Literally translated “clear neck”, these goats have light brown, tan, cream, or grey front ends and black hindquarters. They also have gray or black markings on their heads.

goats

Cou Noir (coo nwah)

Literally translated “black neck”, these goats are the opposite with black front ends and white hindquarters. We've never had a goat with these color markings.

Pied

Spotted or mottled. We've also never had a Pied goat.

Sundgau (sund gow)

Black with white markings on face, legs, and ears.

goats

Chamoisee (sham wah zay)

These goats are range in color from light to dark brown. They can have white, brown, or black markings.

goats 

Two-tone Chamoisee

These goats are similar to cou blancs and cou clairs, except the colors are shades of brown without any black as the dominant color (black markings are typical).

Two-Tone Chamoisee Alpine Dairy Goat

Black

This one speaks for itself.

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Broken

Any pattern that is broken by white markings.

 Broken Color Pattern Alpine Dairy Goat

Or any pattern that is broken by a belt.

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The color patterns don't affect how our goats milk. But they sure make them more fun to look at!

 

PJ Jonas

If you're interested in purchasing goats, please check out our herd at http://gmsgoats.com


Disclaimer: This information is provided as an example of how we personally raise goats at Goat Milk Stuff. We are not veterinarians and any information on the GMS website should not be taken as veterinary advice. Please seek the advice of a professional vet before making any changes to your herd management or individual treatment of your goat.